Saddle Mountain

  Saddle Mountain is a screen play written by Paul H Smith and from the script written into this novella by western novel author Paul L Thompson.

  From 1873 until 1907 Judge Isaac Charles Parker policed seventy-four thousand square miles, with two hundred or so lawmen. The area was called by several names, Last of the Western Frontier, Hell’s Fringe, The Nations and Indian Territory to name only a few. Several more names were used but should not appear in print.

  Sixty-five of Parker’s lawmen would die in the line of duty. Most times greatly out numbered the deputies searched far and wide for killers, rustlers, robbers and horse thieves. When some of those outlaws got word they were hunted by Parker’s marshals, they fled the Nations never to pay for their crimes. Some were shot, but others Parker hung.

  This is a story of how two of those men, Marshal’s Ed Yoes and John Spencer, after years of service would end their long careers as lawmen with Parker.

  J. H. Mershon, a former Parker deputy and now a marshal out of Fort Worth, Texas was in search of a twisted killer and horse thief. He learns three outlaws had broken from Parkers jail and later attack Marshal Spencer and his wife. Now the killer he is after is with Rogers’ gang at a outlaw hideout on Saddle Mountain. J.H. throws in with Yoes and shot up Marshal Spencer, along two more young deputies they had on the search.

  Tracking outlaws in the Nations was hard going, but along the way and after fourteen long years, James Henry Mershon finds a long lost love and a son he never knew he had. Robbery, murder and ambush happen along this rugged trail to Saddle Mountain.